My Grandma Jean Loved to Read Using 2nd Sight!

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Did you know, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, Women’s Bureau, that  women are nearly half  of our Nation’s workforce and more than half of our college graduates? Another interesting stat is the proportion of women with college degrees in the labor force has almost quadrupled since 1970. Guess what? My grandma Jean Dodge was a college graduate,!

I have fond memories of Grandma and she definitely was not boring! Jean lived in a condo, loved to golf, and drove a flashy red Corvair! She enjoyed going on vacations, including cruises too.

The color and model of Jean’s car matched her hair and her fingernails!

Grandma enjoyed spending time vacationing at her and Grandpa’s timeshare condo in Fort Walton Beach, Florida, soaking up the sun and feeding seagulls on the white sand beach. With outstretched arms, she’d hold a few pieces of cooked bacon high in the air and the gulls would swoop down and pluck the bacon from her fingers! At times she’d get a little swarmed and would have to back off the beach! Ahh, she loved Fort Walton Beach (me, too!)

Hey, there she is again, let’s go!

G’ma has a bachelor degree When she met her future husband Jack , they were both attending Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.  It was  unusual for a young woman in those days (like the 30s) to attend college.

Image result for northwestern university chicago mascot

Willie the Wildcat ca 1960 (Northwestern U’s mascot)

In later life, G’ma Jean became legally blind. But, that did not stop her from reading. She constantly absorbed information and being visually handicapped allowed her to do things differently…and with a flair as usual!

My sister Julie brought over this article published  September 7, 1978 in a local Northbrook, Illnois newspaper. I wish I could see closer at which necklace she’s wearing, as Jean loved her jewelry!

Jean Dodge 2nd sight

Taped books offer 2nd sight

 Here’s excerpts from the news article ~

Like many avid readers, Jean P Dodge reads 3 or 4 books a week. Unlike most other readers, she reads with her ears. Mrs. Dodge awoke last Easter to find her vision gone, destroyed by an un-diagnosed illness. That still mystifies doctors. She is one of the few local person who make use of free special library services for the visually and physically handicapped.

The services include Braille and large type (twice the normal size) books, along with phonograph and cassette tape recordings of dramatic readings of books (Talking Books). All these services are available through the Northbrook Public Library 1201 Cedar Ln as well as most other Northshore libraries.

The Golden Notebook, The Black Path, Saffron Skies (I love titles!)

Mrs. Dodge, a self-described former “avid” reader of paperback fiction, said Talking Books serves as a psychological link to the life the 64-year Northbrooker enjoyed before developing impaired vision.

“I’ve been reading for about 60 years, so it (losing most of her vision) made quite a hole in my life. I read constantly. It was one of the greatest sources of my amusement. Talking Books made all the difference in the world to me. I feel so much more normal. It has made such a tremendous difference in life as far as getting back to where I used to do,” she said.

Mrs. Dodge learned about Talking Books from a daughter in law employed at Deerfield Public Library that also supplies the service admitted that without her new verbal world of reading “I would probably go nuts.”

“I would be a very bored and unhappy person. Radio and television would be my only options to pass the time. I can’t be in my car running around anymore,  so I have a lot of spare times. This fills the breach.” ~ the entire article was written by Richard Sheehan.

And so, Grandma, very nice article. Thank you for continuing to do what you loved while also loving all of us grandkids!  My grandma helped instill my love of reading. She even enrolled me in (and paid for it!) a book of the month club! It was great, books mailed right to me. Thank you for helping to shape my history grandma! 

Visit www.WomensHistoryMonth.gov to learn more about the generations of women who have shaped our history.

If I can help you help a client who’s lifestyle has changed due to disability or functional limitation, it’s important to look into new ways of enjoying hobbies and any other avocational activity.  A person should not have to lose out and be bored and unhappy (as g’ma said). If  a life care plan is in order, hobbies (and how they are viewed) in the person’s future can be included. Contact me to discuss your case.

___________________

 My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people participate in the world around them, particularly in their own world of work.

 

350 days of leave! Work Ethic…Brag About It!

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Okay, my last post for now on Randy (five consecutive Mondays is a bit excessive…)  Randy  is into his 20th year teaching for the Des Moines Public School District. He thinks he has around 350 days of sick leave accrued. He says you can only bank 250. I don’t know what that means…but I do know that’s a lot of days. I can’t recall when he’s ever called in sick (I have made him take a personal day……is that ethical Amy?)  Oops sorry.

Welcome Back

 

This is really not Randy, but he does wear just as goofy ties.

Here is an exercise that you can do to help you describe your work ethic in an interview. Trust me, it will help you shine during the interview! You may want to wear a shirt like this to your interview! (That’s a joke.)

Work Ethic Tshirt

This is not Randy either, but I could superimpose a head…naw

Back in July 2012, I blogged about how to answer interview questions using a great approach ~ the STAR method. It really is helpful to be thorough when coming up with answers. 

Rehearse your answers out loud. Practice saying them over and over and over. You’ll be more comfortable during the actual interview experience. Good luck!

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My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people find a place in the workforce

 

Randy and Abe’s Work…Pretty Impressive! Plus a Kiss!

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Okay, even more about Randy. He’s starting to get a bigger head. But he’s still not reading my blogs unless I remind him….what about you my reader, sign up for my posts and they will be emailed to you. : )

Randy has taught the wonderful and well-behaved youth in our community (hee hee) for over 20 years as a teacher for the Des Moines Public School District. He teaches at Casady Alternative Center. The goal is for the students to earn enough credits to either return to their original high school on time to graduate, or to graduate from Casady. Either way, it takes a lot of effort on the kids parts….oh yea and Randy and his fellow teacher pals to accomplish this goal.

At times in all our jobs we must work with, coordinate with, consult with, etc., and/or try to encourage, motivate, teach etc.,…..people who seem to not really care about a project, the subject matter, finding a job, caring for their own bodies, any goals…..on and on and on. You get my point. How do we continue to take pride in our work when it would be easier to throw in the towel?

It goes back to sustaining the pride you take in your work ethic.

And it helps to add humor into your approach with people who may be difficult to work with.  Randy has been known to dress up as characters when he taught a history lesson (a subject often known to be of boring material to youngens…some youngens…not you Taylor Prochnow)!

For example, he has dressed as Mark Twain to teach about (ahh, I don’t really know); and as Abe Lincoln (to teach about Abe Lincoln I guess.) He’ll have to fill the parenthesis in later….and in consideration that he is not at work today because of President’s Day, we’ll see if I can track him down.

Abe

I also need to track down a picture of Randy dressed as Abe

His favorite president I do believe is Abe Lincoln (or is it Richard Nixon?). Randy tends to have an interest in most presidents and really has a good grasp on what they accomplished, or didn’t, during their terms.  I think he likes Jimmy Carter too (I do).

I often hung out with Abe and his son Tad during my lunch break when I worked for the  State.

Okay, to the point of this blog about work ethic. I am pretty certain Abe had a fantastic work ethic and took great pride in his work.  I take great pride in my work and so does Randy. I hope you do too!

Recall from my previous blog that I believe you get your work ethic from your parents. Yet, what about the person who didn’t have great role models yet still exhibit qualities and traits of a hard worker/a person with good work ethic. Here’s an article that will help you grasp the concept of taking pride in your work from the get go.

I’ve found that it can be easy to exceed the expectations of others simply by being someone who is reliable, on-time, diligent and professional. I think these are all hallmarks of people with a strong work ethic.

Here’s some questions to ask and answer yourself about your work ethic:

Attendance ~ Are you dependable, stable and willing to take responsibility for your actions?

Reliability ~ Are you hard working and conscientious about the quality of your work?

Rules of Compliance ~ Are you likely to obey company policies and procedures?

Trustworthiness ~ Do you feel you are trustworthy and trusting of others?

I hope you feel good about answering these questions. When I interview people and find they have a good work ethic (and I often do…it runs deep here in good ole’ Iowa), I know that the person has what employers look for when they hire.

I found a couple shots of Randy and his buddy Abe (know where this sculpture is located)?

Good Friends
Good Friends
He Kissed Me Back!
He Kissed Me Back!

 

Ans

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My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people participate in the world around them, particularly in their own world of work.

Answer: Jordan Creek Mall!

2013 Year of the Snake…Fear of em or Love of em?

Reading Time: 3 minutes

My sister Julie has had problems with snake(s) in her basement during the summer months in the past. She has actually learned how to deal with it rather admirably. I’m not sure if she had one last year or not, but I didn’t hear about it. Julie knows how to save em and send em packing! Here’s a great article about What to Do About Snakes [if you find one in your house!]

There’s no justification for the persecution of these animals!

The point of this blog is not only to point out this is the year of the snake, but it is also to pay attention to what fears some people have. When I work with a client or assess an individual, it is likely that some type of fear, resentment, “issue”, or negative feelings are brought to the surface.

Therefore, it is important to make note of what fears [irrational or not] are part of a person’s daily living. By the way, snakes are great garden predators and only can benefit your garden (plus their droppings are excellent fertilizer since their prey is so well digested)!

Fear exists only in your mind and only in the future…

Fear can be defined as an unpleasant emotion caused by the belief that someone or something is dangerous, likely to cause pain, or a threat.

Ultimately, all rehabilitation counselors have the same goal to help individuals cope and heal by altering their focus in life. We help others understand that although things may have altered dramatically, deep down, the person is still the same – a human with unique fantasies and fears, hopes and dreams, achievements and disappointments.

By working together to come to an understanding of the individual’s abilities and limitations, rehabilitation counselors can help the individual work through the various stages of loss…and emerge on the other side with a fresh outlook on life and the determination to make it through whatever challenges the disability may throw their way.

Read the Full Page: Rehabilitation Counseling – Rehabilitation Counselors  AllAboutCounseling.com

At a recent brain injury rehabilitation conference, the key note speaker stressed “most people will learn to live with the changes in their life if they explore and  focus on the “new you.”

Will this be the Year to Address Your Fear?

I am a fearful when Mother Nature exudes her wrath upon Earth, being relentless and there’s no stopping Her during a scary storm.  But clearly all one can do when She strikes is to be prepared. Make sense? Be prepared, get help and know what you can do to help yourself and your family if fear gets in your way of daily living.

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My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people participate in the world around them, particularly in their own world of work.

People and Their Pets…Got Cat? Pet Ownership

Reading Time: 3 minutes

When I meet with an individual to perform a vocational assessment, I ask many questions to gather information about their work and life background. One question I ask, underlying other questions regarding psychosocial factors, is about pet ownership. Asking about pet ownership during an evaluation can tell me a lot about a person!

Got Cat? Rabbit? Snake? Fish? Iguana? Bearded Dragon?

Of course pet ownership is not for everyone, but if the individual is a pet owner, and a discussion develops about the topic, it offers me insight about the person. Pet ownership allows for psycho-social benefits accruing within an individual from the one-to-one type interactions with their pets.

Pet ownership can also influence broader social interactions and perceptions, experiences of sense of community, and social capital at the neighborhood level. In addition, a pet owner’s sense of health and well-being often emerges as a valuable and positive feature of daily living.

SamiJo The Love of My Life!
SamiJo The Love of My Life!

This is SamiJo, the Love of My Life!

Okay: I have 3 cats (Felix, SamiJo and Alaska), a dog (Bella), a guinea pig (Peggy), and a fish (Bluebee). Oh, and a hedge hog (Sandslash). My beloved rabbit, (a mini rex named Patches) died last week.

It’s a big responsibility to own a pet. You must provide basic care which includes food, water, shelter, veterinary care and exercise for your pet. And you must abide by the City’s bylaws around pets and animals.  For Bella’s 5th birthday awhile back, she received a dog pass to the Riverwalk Dog Park!

Patches
Patches

Patches was a grateful rabbit

Patches had plush, velvet like fur and a happy personality. A mini rex is known as “The Velveteen Rabbit”. Patches was small, weighing 3-4 pounds. He liked to lunge out of his wooden hut when his cage door was opened. Some people (like my husband) got a little frightened of this burst out thinking they were in danger! But I saw his behavior as a great show of energy! I also loved his happy hops!

 Patches loved rose petals….He ate them! 

Patches always was thankful when he was fed (and especially when he received a treat!) with a little snorty sound. I had noticed he was getting very thin, however he still was eating. And then one morning, he was not lunging out of his hut, and he was very still, yet he was breathing. I checked on him several more times.

Later in the afternoon he did lunge out, although it was a very unusual lunge. He bonked off his litter box and landed on his side. I started to pet him……continuing to stroke his very soft fur….until he died.

Think about pets you’ve known and understand why I find it important to ask about pet ownership. Have you ever gone to a dog park and learned dogs’ names, but never asked the owners for theirs? And observed their behaviors (both dogs and owners) to compile evidence about your theory of dog parks!?!

In a previous post on April 2nd 2012, I blogged about another question I ask about the person’s nutritional intake and habits. Want to Heal that Injury? Focus on Your Nutrition!  Healthy nutritional intake is just as important for your body as it is for your pets. Please feed everyone well!

For You Patches. I Love You!

Let me know if you have questions about how I perform a vocational assessment. You can also click over to the right under documents for download to see a sample vocational assessment and evaluation report.

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 My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people participate in the world around them, particularly in their own world of work.

Motivational Assessments…Right on Baby!

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Back in February 2012 I wrote about motivation….and am continuing with this psychological feature of life.  Sometimes I look back and say to myself, gee Amy you must be a pretty darn motivated person huh? So is my husband for that matter. We’ve both accomplished quite a bit at this point in life. But boy, isn’t it nice to hang out at a pool (which we did recently at Embassy Suites) and do, well, nothing!

Ahhhhh, don’t I wish!

Anyway, back to the point of this blog. I’ve taken a motivational assessment and because I am pleased with it, I offer it to interested clients. It’s called the Motivational Appraisal of Personal Potential ~ MAPP.

The MAPP is a self-discovery tool used in career exploration. After entering data, I was provided with a confidential document and I was pretty surprised by the results! I’ll point out just a few discoveries about me from the assessment, indicating you may receive results that are valuable to you as well.

The first section focuses on interest in job content (those vocational tasks you want to perform), temperament for the job (how you prefer to perform tasks), and aptitude for the job (expression of performing tasks). Other sections cover how you relate to people, things, data, reasoning, and applied usage of math and language.

The vocational analysis section ranked my highest potential is in Writing and Journalism; and Counseling, Guidance. Right on baby!

Right On Baby!

There’s a graphical summary that uses Worker Trait Code Charts to represent the breakdown of your personal scores into numbers and percentiles. This information determines the person’s level of motivation for specific traits. The higher [or lower] the number/percentile allows you to view your capacity to succeed or compete with the general population in the trait area of activity.  Traits in Level 1 are compulsive; Level 2 is highly motivated; Level 3 is moderately motivated, and so on.

The MAPP results (along with helpful interpretation of it from a vocational counselor like me) aids you (the job seeker or career changer) to identify your motivations and learn how to use them to be successful in your career and life plan. It’s important to keep in mind that this assessment, like all assessments, is not a sole determinant for whatever you set out to measure.  The MAPP does not determine whether you can or cannot perform in a job, it rather indicates if you will perform.

My results reveal I am compulsively (yikes, that can be a scary word…so let’s use the word driven as its synonym) interested in being concerned with people and for providing service dedicated to the interest of others. I am driven to literacy and/or communication tasks. I relate to others with a service communication style and voluntarily inform others.

I am not that particularly motivated by things, but I have a high level of motivation to compile (gather, classify, store information) and copy (duplicate, transcribe, record and send) data. My language capacity is highly systematic, with a logical explanation and education orientation.  I am literary creative with a strong communicative ability. I am moderately motivated with reasoning concepts, and applying math.  Again, right on baby!

There’s so much more to this assessment….  That’s just some of what arose to the surface for me.  I’d be happy to discuss how assessments are useful when planning your next steps in life.  Or to evaluate where you are and how you got there….which I’ve been doing while I blog about my past and how it’s brought me to the present.

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My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people participate in the world around them, particularly in their own world of work.

Chicagoland….My Birthday….and the Riot Fest! What a weekend!

Reading Time: 3 minutes

We returned from Chicago early this morning, say like 2AM… and I suppose Randy is a bit tired from driving, basically, since Friday morning when we left our hotel at 6AM for other activities! But I’m sure he’s enjoying teaching today!

We went to Downtown Chicago on Friday and checked out the sites.

I always love to hang out on the beach!

The main reason for our trip was to take Arin and Xavier to the Riot Fest. Riot Fest is a 2 day outdoor music fest in Humboldt Park. Sound fun to you?

 The official drop off/pick spot for the kids

On Saturday, (my birthday!) after picnicking and dropping the kids off in the park, we hung out in a forest preserve, listened to the Cubs on the car’s radio and watched the jets fly into O’Hare.

Then we went to church, hung out again, drank beer, and ate in the hotel room, and drove back to get the kids.  Exciting huh?! And on Sunday after dropping the kids off again at  Humboldt Park, we went to a Chicago Cubs game….and they won!!! Then we picked up the kids and drove home, leaving about 8PM.

 My type of fun!

 My parents are from the Chicago area as I’ve talked about in past blogs. I was born in Libertyville, Illinois. During our trip we witnessed some truly nice people, and yes some rude driving. But that’s all expected. Randy does not like Chicago, but I do.

I think about all the people who work in Chicagoland every day. They get around in many different ways, bike, bus, train, bicycles, scooters, their own vehicles. There are commuters galore!  And I think of all the different jobs, and the different ways of doing so many different jobs.  We’re talking diversity galore, too!

The Bean!

 According to the US Census Bureau, July, 2011, the population of Chicago is 2,707,120. The largest employers are the U.S. Government, Chicago Public Schools, City of Chicago, Cook County, Advocate Health Care – that’s a lot of workers!

The Chicago teachers remain on strike. And with Randy being a Des Moines Public School teacher, he was quite interested in what is going on. The kids would love not being in school!  But all days will need to be made up.

In an upcoming blog I’m going to write about my husband and his work ethic. You’d be impressed!

Thank you for reading! Go Cubbies! (Randy wore a Cincinnati Reds shirt to the game…)  Can you believe it?   HOLY COW! 

___________________

My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people find a place in the workforce.

 


* Vocational Resources Plus, LLC  *   lcpresourcesplus.com *

VocResourcesPlus@msn.com

 

How My Past has Brought Me to The Present! The Student with 2 Brains ~ Part 17

Reading Time: 4 minutes

In Spring of 1994 I took 19 credits, and I did really well academically. I like to relate it to the fact that at that time in my life, I had two brains! Yes you read that right!

I was pregnant with my second child!

 Ahhh, the beautiful brain. FYI:  Your brain weighs 2 to 4 pounds and is comprised of at least 60% fat. It is the fattest system in your body. It’s a compliment when you get called a fat head!

I happen to be quite fond of the amygalda (uh mig’ dull uh).  The amygalda (aka the “emotional brain) is a set of subcortical nuclei that is important for perceiving in others and having in oneself emotional or affective behaviors and feelings (eg: fear, anger). It’s a component of the limbic system. Emotions convey a lot useful information. In a future blog, I will write about emotional intelligence, but for this week’s writing I want to focus on brain health.

The amygalda – the name, comes from ‘like an almond’

I’ve been attending Brain Health Seminars hosted by Emeritus Senior Living in Urbandale, Iowa. The topics are very interesting and revolve around Paul David Nussbaum Ph.D’s research.  Dr. Nussbaum is a Clinical Neuropsychologist and Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.  Website for  Paul David Nussbaum, Ph.D.  

Dr. Nussbaum is an International Leader on Brain Health Lifestyle and has recently written a book titled SAVE YOUR BRAIN The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp”

Yes, there are six slices, but who could resist?

The five critical areas of brain health, or the “slices to the brain health pie,” include:

Socialization, Physical Activity, Mental Stimulation*, Spirituality and Nutrition

One of the Brain Health Seminars focused on *Mental & Cognitive Stimulation.  The featured speaker was Polly Johnston, Program Specialist, Iowa Alzheimer’s Association.  Polly explains Dr. Nussbaum focuses on the mind’s five main cognitive functions:

~  Language Skills  ~  Memory  ~  Concentration & Attention  ~ Visual & Spatial  ~ Executive Functions (Logic & Reasoning) ~

 Polly taught our group how to come up with ideas to cognitively stimulate our brain.  She recommends we try something new and challenging each day.  Here is one I love: If you are right handed, (I am), use your left hand to eat, write or use your car keys. I personally like to shoot pool positioning the cue stick in my left hand (not that it helps my game, but I do it anyway!)

Many years ago, when I broke my right wrist in a car accident,  I had to use my left hand quite a bit for the six weeks it was in a cast. For example, I wrote, ate, brushed my teeth and washed my hair left handed (covering cast with a bread bag so it wouldn’t get as wet!) Using my left hand/arm helped me conceptualize how important it is to try to be ambidextrous. My husband claims to be….maybe to some degree, luckily for him his mother was a lefty!

Other ideas to exercise your brain include get yourself a Brain Games/Puzzle Book (there are plenty on line to do). 

Plan for exciting travel!

 Learn a new musical instrument (this engages different parts of your brain and why our DMPS schools need to never ever rid our students of the opportunities for band, choir, symphony…..).

Additionally, listen to wonderful classical music!

In his high school days, my son Nick played:  alto sax, bari sax, flute, baritone, and piano.  My daughter Arin takes band lessons (thank you Mr. Most Talented Craig Swartz, Instrumental Music Director of Des Moines Public Schools) and plays the flute for her school. She also self-taught in a number of instruments, and plays the guitar, bass, ukulele and piano. As an aside, my 15 year old beauty also self-taught in sign language! I am in awe when she signs songs. Absolutely beautiful.

I blog…..which really helps my brain! I receive the online Word of the Day (I love this). And, well I work! Think brain, think, how else do I exercise my brain? Does golf count (without getting pissed off?) I really want to play the piano again (I took lessons from Ms. Schweiger for many years as a youngster while growing up in Iowa Falls.)

What do you do to exercise your brain?

I started this blog with the baby inside topic….but never did mention Jacob…..next week young man! Read on!

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How My Past has Brought Me to The Present! Part 5

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Continuing on from my post titled How My Past has Brought Me to The Present – as a Rehab Counselor! Part 4

I started working for the State of Iowa as a Clerk Typist III-IV at the Disability Determination Services Bureau (DDSB) in 1987. Disability Determination Services are state agencies funded by the United States Federal Government.  Their purpose is to make disability findings for the Social Security Administration.  Applicants for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) file applications for disability benefits at local Social Security field offices.  (Taken from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia…this was the most simple explanation I’ve located so far).

DDSB is located at 535 SW 7th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50309-4535, 515-725-0700  To apply for disability, you can call to make an appointment or apply online.  “Disability” is defined in different contexts using different methods for specific programs. This Social Security Administration website may help you – What We Mean By Disability.

At DDSB, I performed clerical/secretarial work for disability examiners (Hi Paul Kreger!)  Examiners evaluate initial and reconsideration claims for disability benefits under the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs, determines eligibility according to Social Security regulations, policies and procedures.

I had a green IBM Selectric

My job involved typing up (yep with use of good old typewriters) and mailing out a variety of forms, memos and  documents, correspondence and decisions to people who have applied for disability.  I also transcribed reports from dictation (and some handwritten notes) using transcription machines.

Transcriptionist

I worked around several ladies (no males in our pool) and we transcribed every day! 

Head set on, foot operating the transcription pedal, furiously typing away.  Such cacophony!  We always had to makes duplicates, and even triplicate forms….which means if you made a typo, the first page, upon hitting the correction key may get “fixed” but the carbon copies – oh my it took the fabulous smelling, wonderful whiteout!

Towards the lend of my days at DDSB we got – drum roll please, word processors.  The mainframe of our computer took two entire office spaces!  

I learned a lot about the ins/outs of applying for disability.  It takes patience and perseverance (completeness and accuracy to your application as well) if your disability is not “cut and dry”…. and can be frustrating considering it can take a LONG time to know the status of your claim.

Don’t give up the process of applying for disability if you sincerely realize you cannot work anywhere. I have experience helping others successfully with their permanent and total disability claims.

Stay tuned for Part 6!

___________________

 My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people participate in the world around them, particularly in their own world of work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Solutions for People With Disabilities

Reading Time: 1 minute

Solutions for People With Disabilities


Job Placement Services

Matching People With Their World of Work

Matching People Within Their Own World of Work

Job Analyses & Job Descriptions

Life Care Planning Services

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Occupational Health Consultation

Rehabilitation Counseling*

*For more information visit CRCC | Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification, CRC
www.crccertification.com/

I LOVE REHAB

Vocational Case Management

Vocational Resources Plus, LLC * lcpresourcesplus.com * 515-282-7753  * VocResources@msn.com

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My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people participate in the world around them, particularly in their own world of work.