Here’s a Dum-Dum Post! Want an Expert too?

Reading Time: 4 minutes

In February 2020, at the beginning of the awareness of Covid-19, I attended a large conference with well over 200 people in attendance. During lunch, I sat at a table next to an intelligent man and we had a conversation about our jobs and serving as an expert “in the field”. His field is neuropsychology and mine is forensic rehabilitation.

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Both interesting jobs involving brainwork, don’t you agree?

During our conversation, I explained how I want my courtroom testimony to be communicated to the jury in plain language so it is understand the first time they hear it.

The audience I’m communicating with is in no way, shape or form dum-dum, they simply don’t have “forensic expertise”. They do have good listening skills! I deliver my opinion using a matter of fact strategy that makes sense. This is rather easy for me, because I am a simple, basic person who has studied the case indepth.

I’m no dum-dum either

We continued to discuss how some experts use complicated language in court. It seems that expert wants the jury to believe the expert has incredible intelligence and cryptic knowledge of a complicated subject matter. I see this as a misguided attempt to manipulate the audience about how to view the facts. And I’m pretty sure each juror can see through the muck too! My lunch mate seemed to know the type of expert I was referring to. 

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I love it when Perry Mason eviscerates a pompous, stuffy “expert” on the witness stand!

My belief is that jurors deserve to hear the facts in a truthful, clear and simple manner. Yes, my lunch mate agreed. He summed it up by saying “jurors know the difference between corn and soybeans.” In other words, give us the facts and let us decide which is which because that’s our job in this case.

For fun, I did a little research on Dum Dums

The spherical lollipops originated from Akron Candy Company in Bellevue, Ohio, in 1924. The sales manager of the company, named them, thinking “Dum Dums” was a phrase any child could say.

Initially, there were 7 flavors: lemon, lime, orange, coconut-pineapple, cherry, grape, and butterscotch. Dum Dums are now made in 16 flavors, with new flavors rotating into the mix every so often.

Ewzzy — Once in generation a Mystery Flavor Dum Dum will...The “Mystery Flavor”

The “Mystery Flavor” is the result of the end of one batch mixing with the next batch, rather than stopping production to clean machines in between flavors.  Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dum_Dums_(lollipop)

You can tell this decision saved time, and allowed the company to be creative with their product which likely increased interest and ultimately sales! Talk about not being a dum-dum!

Also, just FYI; if you have any Dum-Dums wrappers left, send them in ASAP because (after nearly 70 years), Dum Dums lollipops will be ending its program to exchange wrappers for toys and prizes. The company’s mail in program, which began in 1953, will come to an end on May 31, 2020!  (Sorry, that was yesterday, missed the timeline, but you could try!)

No more regulation-size rubber baseball and metal wastebasket that could be acquired for 15 cents and 15 wrappers…the “Dum Dums Wastebasket Deal”. I’m sure you’ve seen, or even had one similar, to play basketball in your office space.

Dum Dums Garden

Any legal decision is all about: what can be done to answer questions, solve problems, use time wisely, and make or save $$$ in a lawsuit. Because I work on the plaintiff or the defense side, my forensic work helps in any court case. Contact me and we can discuss your case. I’m here to help attorneys help their clients.
 
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If you want a dum dum, I’ll be happy to provide one on a stick (watermelon flavor is tasty!) If you want an expert, I’ll be happy to send you information on retaining me as an expert.
 
Thank you for reading my dum dum post!  Here’s another post titled Don’t be a Dumb Bunny! In this post, I write about using your soft skills…another valuable skill to use in a court room!
 
 

Vocational Resources Plus, LLC * 515-778-0634  * amyebotkin@lcpresourcesplus.com

___________________

 My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people participate in the world around them, particularly in their own world of work.

 

What Did Your Grandfather’s Father Do for a Living? Need Evidence on An Occupation?

Reading Time: 5 minutes

My mother Ann Dodge Prochnow, researched a book titled “Genealogy of the Dodge Family of Essex County, Massachusetts 1629-1894” authored by John Thompson Dodge Ph.D. Dr. Dodge was born in 1850 in Vermont. Dr. Dodge was a railway civil engineer. And he’s directly related to my mom!

My mom read the book (Ann’s brother Gerry Dodge accessed it for her online). It clearly took a lot of work, but my mom, with great speed, skill and accuracy of course!, typed several pages summarizing her research; and gave me a copy as a Christmas gift! I read it with fascination! While reading my mom’s paper, I heard myself saying hum, wow; and really?…and laughing a time or two!

Genealogy of Dodge Family Book Cover

The Book Cover, authored by John Thompson Dodge Ph.D.

Here’s my synopsis of my mom’s synopsis:

The Dodge’s are all direct descendants from Richard Dodge who was born in 1602.  My mom’s great-grandfather is Vilas Luther Dodge, born October 28, 1847 in Vermont. Vilas worked as a farmer and stock raiser in Jersey County, Illinois. He was County Supervisor and School board member, and also Director of Jersey County Agriculture and Mechanical Association. He was 5’9’ and 200 pounds! (sounds shaped kindly like someone I know…)

Vilas married Laura Dannel on February 21, 1871. Vilas and Laura had children born in Kemper, Illinois: Mary born in 1871, infant son born and died in 1872, George Dannell (my mother’s grandfather) born July 21, 1876, Ann Charlott born 1878, Fred Leroy (my mom’s Uncle Fred) born 1881 and Harriet (my mom’s Aunt Hattie) born 1886.

Genealogy Book Cover Tree

It can be exciting to learn about a family’s genealogy!

George Dannell Dodge married my mom’s grandma Helen Porter in Jerseyville, Illinois in 1907 and moved to Chicago. There they had William, John Vilas (my grandpa), Helen and Laura. Later they moved to Evanston, Illinois. All their children attended Northwestern University. George died in Jerseyville in 1960s and Helen in her 90s in New York.

My grandpa Jack married Jean. They had Ann (my #1 Mom), John, Gerald and Kathleen.  By the way, Mom and Gerald (my Uncle Gerry who lives in San Francisco) are planning to get to the Plate side of Jean’s family in the future.

Throughout these years in history, the men of the Dodge name held many jobs with professions spanning many fields (read on below please).

My grandpa John (“Jack”) Vilas Dodge was an incredible man and had an amazing career that took him all over the world! He worked in writing, as a publishing executive. I am very proud to be one of his grand-daughters! Mom tells me that her dad’s father had an insurance agency and his father’s father did too! For this blog post, I focus on colleges the Dodge family graduated from; and occupations employed by the Dodge family throughout the generations.

Relatives of the Dodge family graduated from the following colleges:  Harvard, Williams, Yale, Middleburg, Dartmouth, Colby, Vermont, Wisconsin, Amherst, Bowdoin, Brown, Columbia, Anion, Andover and Emory. Graduates included a few Dodge women!

Austin Hall, Harvard Law School Picture

Austin Hall, Harvard Law School

Relatives of the Dodge family held occupations of:  Farmer, carpenter, teacher, physician, lawyer, tailor, tanner, minister, legislator, shoemaker, shipping business, cooper, factory owner, cabinetmaker, blacksmith, mason, currier, leather dealer, stone cutter, stock breeder, clothier, editor, military service, insurance agent, constable, cotton manufacturer, banker, merchant, bookkeeper, newspaper business, lumber business, land surveyor, steamboat captain, harness maker, musician, and civil engineer.

Pretty incredible careers  during this time period, wouldn’t you agree?!

Do for A Living

Lawyer, Teacher, Physical Therapist, Registered Nurse, Doctor, Accountant, Social Worker, Paralegal, Psychologist, Dentist, Engineer, Police Officer…..Chef! All Incredible Careers! 

I had to look up one job (not found  in O*NET but guess what, it is in the DOT!). A cooper* is someone in the trade of making utensils, casks, drums and barrels and other accessories, usually out of wood, but sometimes using other materials.

In other words, the cooper used many tools to do his work, he had craftsman skills with a keen eye for detail and a focus on quality control! I could consult with Living History Farms for a job analysis!

Plus, I looked up the difference between work as a currier (a specialist in the leather processing industry) and  that of a tanner (a person whose occupation is to tan hides, or convert them into leather by the use of tan).

In the past for my job, I’ve toured a tanning facility with my eyes bugging out at the strength needed by the tanners to throw the hides! In this case to analyze the job, I could interview with a person who actually does the heavy work to get first hand information!

Heart

I love assessing  worker skills, researching workplace environments, analyzing jobs, and interviewing workers!

As far as the numerous other occupations held by the Dodges, they range greatly. The Dodges used brain power, brawn power and the power to influence others (for example: attorney, banker, musician, steamboat captain, physician, engineer, insurance agent, legislator minister and … clothier!)

A Clothier

A clothier was popular, yes dapper indeed!

They used all types of machinery, hand tools, and up-to-date-for-that-time technology. The tools of any trade are tremendous! The talent from performing daily work and the credibility in a community becomes tantamount to a successful career. Boy would I have loved to interview any one of these talented individuals in their day and write their story!

I am completely fascinated by what people do for a living! Take some precious time and check into your parent’s parents’ work background. You well have well spent your time and you may be quite surprised! I was with the Dodge family that helped to form part of who I am! (Guess which part and win a prize!)

I believe work involves so much more than we think it does or see what happens when it’s performed! Think about your work and how it can evolve and change each day with your skill set!

Are you tapping into skills related to Counseling? Science? Art? Empathy? Or are you ready for a vacation where your paid work takes a break? I’m not so sure your grandfather’s father received vacation pay (and I don’t as a self employed individual).

Bonus blog: Why Do You Do Your Work? You May Be In Love!

Contact me, Amy (Prochnow) Botkin for vocational guidance or evidence on any occupation or career!  BTW, you wouldn’t find a forensic rehabilitation counselor back in the “olden days” which always brings to my mind the mystery of the working world.

If I can help you with your litigated cases, please let me know.  My specialty is consulting on cases involving work. Thank you for reading!

Vocational Resources Plus LLC        515-778-0634    amyebotkin@lcpresourcesplus.com 

___________________

 My professional rehabilitation counseling practice is focused on helping people participate in the world around them, particularly in their own world of work.